Woodhull Institute
The Woodhull Institute programs train women to "lead with honesty, respect, courage and compassion, to strive for the common ground in decision-making and to share in community service"...

About the Woodhull Institute Project

Woodhull Institute LogoIn the past the NCPC launched an exciting initiative in partnership with the Woodhull Institute for Ethical Leadership. We were selecting young Native American women who had potential as leaders and who were committed to following traditional ways, who were either Dancers or who were living on the reservation in the Intermountaine area. The Woodhull training enhanced their sense of empowerment and trains them in techniques for ethical, effective leadership. It got them off the reservation, provides intensive training, ongoing support and networking and put them back in their communities to function as leaders.

The Woodhull Institute programs trained women to "lead with honesty, respect, courage and compassion, to strive for the common ground in decision-making and to share in community service." It offered empowerment courses on financial literacy and basic business skills, public speaking, negotiation and advocacy, writing, ethics in the workplace, networking and acquiring mentoring relationships.

All too often in traditional communities, talented women are not encouraged or trained to step forward as leaders nor are they trained in the specific skills that make this effective. Woodhull taught them to do this well.

Marian SnowNCPC's partnership with the Woodhull Institute allowed us to select young Native American women who were already committed to traditional ways and to provide this training for them, which enriched them personally and helped their communities with effective, proven leadership skills.

NCPC was honored to sponsor Marian Snow, Mohawk from the Kahnawake Reserve in Canada, as our first Fellow. Marian attended the Dance of All Nations in 2004 and 2005 where she performed a pan-Indian Jingle Blessing Dance. As a Woodhull Fellow, she attended a three-day Intensive Leadership Training session in New York State and came away with a stronger sense of her own capabilities and how she could help people on the Reserve. She has already been asked to be a spokesperson on Native culture and governance to the outside world.